Matthew 3


Matthew 3:1

Now in those days John the Baptist came, preaching in the wilderness of Judea, saying,

John the Baptist. The original word for baptist is a verb (baptizō), so a more accurate translation would be John the Baptizer. Although Matthew and Luke referred to John as John the Baptist (e.g., Matt. 3:1, 11:11, 14:2, 8, 16:14, 17:13, Luke 7:20, 33, 9:19), Mark consistently called him John the Baptizer (e.g., Mark 1:4, 6:14, 24-25, 8:28).


Matthew 3:2

“Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.”

Repent. To repent means to change your mind. In context, it means changing your mind about Christ and the goodness of God (Rom. 2:4). “Change your unbelieving mind and believe the glad tidings of the kingdom that has come.” See entry for Repentance.


Matthew 3:6

and they were being baptized by him in the Jordan River, as they confessed their sins.

Baptized. The original word implies total immersion. See entry for Baptism.


Matthew 3:10

“The axe is already laid at the root of the trees; therefore every tree that does not bear good fruit is cut down and thrown into the fire.

(a) The axe is already laid at the root. The law-keeping covenant that Israel had with the Lord is coming to an end.

(b) The root. The self-righteous root of unbelief cannot sustain you. We are meant to be rooted in Christ (Rom. 11:18).

(c) Every tree that does not bear good fruit. The tree is the unbelieving nation of Israel.

This warning is not directed to Christians, but self-righteous religious people such as the Pharisees and Sadducees of verse 7. See also Matt. 23:33.

Further reading: “The axe at the root


Matthew 3:11

“As for me, I baptize you with water for repentance, but He who is coming after me is mightier than I, and I am not fit to remove His sandals; He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and fire.

(a) Baptize… baptize. The original word implies total immersion. See entry for Baptism.

(b) With the Holy Spirit; see entry for Mark 1:8.


Matthew 3:13

Then Jesus arrived from Galilee at the Jordan coming to John, to be baptized by him.

Baptized. The original word implies total immersion. See entry for Baptism.


Matthew 3:17

and behold, a voice out of the heavens said, “This is My beloved Son, in whom I am well-pleased.”

Beloved. The original word (agapetos) means dearly loved, esteemed, favorite and worthy of love. It is closely related to a verb (agapao) that means to be well pleased or fond of or contented. God the Father not only loves God the Son, but he is deeply fond of him and well-pleased with him (Matt. 12:18, 17:5, Mark 1:11, 9:7, 12:6, Luke 3:22, 9:35, 20:13, 2 Pet. 1:17).

This word also describes the believer who is in Christ. You are God’s beloved child. Your heavenly Father is fond of you. You are his esteemed favorite and he is well pleased with you.

All the epistle writers referred to believers as the beloved or dearly-loved children of God (see entry for Rom. 1:7).


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