Mark 10


Mark 10:8

AND THE TWO SHALL BECOME ONE FLESH; so they are no longer two, but one flesh.

(a) One flesh. There joining together of a man and a woman into one flesh or body has both a physical aspect (see 1 Cor. 6:16), and a spiritual aspect (1 Cor. 6:17).

(b) They are no longer two, but one. When a man and a woman come together in marriage, they create something new – a marital union (Gen. 2:24). This union symbolizes the unity the believers have with the Lord (Eph. 5:32).


Mark 10:17

As He was setting out on a journey, a man ran up to Him and knelt before Him, and asked Him, “Good Teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?”

(a) What shall I do to inherit eternal life? There is nothing you can to do to inherit eternal life – it’s an inheritance. You only get it when someone dies, and Someone did.

Like the rich man, some people are confused about salvation. They think that if they are basically good people, God will have to admit them into his kingdom. Such people are truly lost for they are relying on their self-righteousness.

(b) Eternal life is living forever in union with Jesus; see entry for John 3:15.


Mark 10:18

And Jesus said to him, “Why do you call Me good? No one is good except God alone.

(a) Why do you call Me good? Jesus knew the man was self-righteous and considered himself a good person. Jesus cut straight to the heart of the man’s sin by challenging his standard of goodness.

(b) No one is good except God alone. God alone is the definition of goodness and righteousness.

The defining ingredient of self-righteousness is that you are providing your own standard of righteousness. When you decide what is good and right, perhaps on the basis of your own moral judgment or the law, you are eating from the wrong tree and usurping God’s role as the Righteous Judge. True righteousness comes from trusting in Jesus, the Righteous One (2 Cor. 5:21).

(c) God. Most of the time when Jesus spoke about God, he called him Father (see entry for Luke 2:49). But when speaking to the religious leaders and those under law, he typically called him God (theos).


Mark 10:20

And he said to Him, “Teacher, I have kept all these things from my youth up.”

The self-righteous man boasts in his law-keeping. “God must be pleased with me because I have kept the rules and passed the test.” He does not realize that he is an idolater glorifying himself and a law-breaker to boot. By claiming to be good on his own merits, he effectively calls God a liar (see Rom. 3:10, 23).


Mark 10:45

“For even the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give His life a ransom for many.”

A ransom for many. Was Jesus’ life offered as a ransom for many (Matt. 20:28) or a ransom for all (see 1 Tim. 2:6)? Both. Jesus paid for all but not all receive his grace. Many do; some don’t.

On the cross, the Lamb of God bore the sins of all (John 1:29, 1 John 2:2), and he bore the sins of many (Heb. 9:28). His righteousness is freely offered to all (Rom. 3:22), but only many are made righteous (Rom. 5:19). Forgiveness of sins is proclaimed to all (Luke 24:47), but his blood only brings forgiveness to many (Matt. 26:28). The grace of God brings salvation to all (Tit. 2:11), but only abounds to the many (Rom. 5:15).


Mark 10:47

When he heard that it was Jesus the Nazarene, he began to cry out and say, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!”

Mercy is what grace looks like when you are needy. See entry for Mercy.


Mark 10:52

And Jesus said to him, “Go; your faith has made you well.” Immediately he regained his sight and began following Him on the road.

(a) Your faith has made you well. It is the grace of God that brings healing, but since grace only comes by faith (Eph. 2:8), Jesus said what he said.

(b) Made you well can also be translated made you whole. The original word (sozo) is usually translated as save (e.g., Matt. 1:21), but it also implies healing. When Jesus healed the sick, he sozo ed them; he healed them (Mark 5:23), delivered them (Luke 8:36) and made them whole (Matt. 9:21). See entry for Salvation.


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